Odd Spirits is Available for Purchase

Welcome to publication day! Odd Spirits is now available for digital purchase in the Amazon kindle store and (if you don’t feel like giving Jeff Bezos 30% of your purchase) on Smashwords for only $2.99! That’s less than your morning latte!

It takes a lot of commitment to make a marriage between a modern ceremonial magician and a chaos witch work, but when a malevolent entity takes up residence in Rhys and Moira’s home, their love will be pushed to the limits. Brewing up a solution is easier said than done when your magical styles are polar opposites; throw a psychic ex and a secret society in the mix, and things are bound to get messy.

This diverse paranormal romance novella is perfect for fans of The Raven Cycle and The Haunting of Hill House.odd spirits

Can I read the digital copy without an e-reader? Absolutely! You can read it on your phone, laptop, or tablet for free without any special software

I only read print books. Will there be a paperback edition? Yes! As soon as Amazon approves my submission we will be in the paperback business. I will also be selling print copies direct from me if you prefer to bypass Amazon and get a free autograph out of the deal.

I pre-ordered a book and my order was cancelled? Sorry to hear that! Due to technichal difficulties, Amazon cancelled and refunded many pre-orders. DM and I’ll get you hooked up with your copy!

I’m strapped for cash right now; is there any other way I can support you? Reblogging this post is a great help to me! Also, if you’ve received a copy of the book, reviews on Amazon and Goodreads are a blessing to me.

I’d like to donate some spare change to your writing so you can turn out more books. Do you have a Patreon? Yes! Every donation helps, even one dollar, and I’ve got cute bat-themed prizes for my Patrons.

Thanks for your support, and happy reading!

Hey Book Lovers!

Anyone out there want a free e-copy of ODD SPIRITS in exchange for an honest review on their blog/social media and Amazon?

It takes a lot of commitment to make a marriage between a modern ceremonial magician and a chaos witch work, but when a malevolent entity takes up residence in Rhys and Moira’s home, their love will be pushed to the limits. Brewing up a solution is easier said than done when your magical styles are polar opposites; throw a psychic ex and a secret society in the mix, and things are bound to get messy.

Think The Haunting of Hill House meets The Raven Cycle with a multicultural married couple and LGBTQ protags. The book is novella length at just under 100 pages, so it’s a perfect weekend read.

odd spirits

Comment below or shoot me a message at sarahtaylorgibson@gmail.com if you’re interested and I’ll hook you up, no strings attached! E-copies will be sent out early next week.

Non-book bloggers, make sure to mark Odd Spirits as to-read on Goodreads,and keep your eyes peeled for a super-steal sale on pre-orders coming in just a few days!

FICTION REVIEW: The Beloveds

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Title: The Beloveds by Maureen Lindley
Genre: Suspense/Gothic
Rating:  ★★ (2/5)

Elizabeth Stash has never really loved anything in her life except Pipits, the cherished ancestral home of her childhood in rural England. Even when her mother’s favoritism for Elizabeth’s despised little sister Gloria reared its head, Pipits was there to enfold Elizabeth into a voice that spoke through creaking wood and rustling curtains. Her obsessive love for the house only grows with time, and when Elizabeth’s mother dies she is certain that she, the eldest daughter, will rightfully inherit Pipits. But when the will specifies that Pipits will pass to beautiful, beloved Gloria, Elizabeth begins to hatch an ugly plan that will soon consume her entirely.

The Beloveds is a book that flirts with the supernatural but for the most part stays staunchly psychological, delving deep into the malice which Elizabeth nurtures and cultivates.  Elizabeth is a narcissist who can’t properly empathize with other people, considers herself superior to them, and is constantly convinced she’s been wronged.  As far as unreliable, unsympathetic narrators go, Elizabeth held my attention, though some of her diatribes about being betrayed bordered on repetitive.

The tension in this book ratchets wonderfully as the narrator becomes more and more delusional, and as her actions become progressively more criminal and poorly disguised. However, and to my great disappointment, this suspense ultimately comes to nothing. Elizabeth character’s steadily erodes, but the lives of those around her remain largely unchanged, as as the book reaches what I hoped would be a gloriously cacophonous crescendo, it goes out with a whimper rather than a bang.

The Beloveds is an engaging read that cultivates a Gothic atmosphere without pulling in some of the more scenery-chewing tropes of the genre, but ultimately, it falls flat. It felt like one long character sketch, and Elizabeth’s family remained so unbelievably oblivious to her machinations that I supposed there must be some catch, something hidden from the narrator that would be revealed in the big finish. Sadly, there was not, and without any satisfying cherry on the cake of nastiness, The Beloveds is ultimately an unremarkable summer read.

Note: I received a copy of The Beloveds in exchange for an honest review. The Beloveds is set to drop on April 3, 2018.

FICTION REVIEW: Binti

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Title: Binti by Nnedi Okorafor
Genre: Science Fiction/Afrofuturism
Rating:  ★★★★ (4/5)

Binti is the first member of her small African tribe to be accepted into the universe of the galaxy. She’s a harmonizer, a mathematics genius with a near-spiritual connection to the complex technologies and equations that under-gird the universe, and even though she’s terrified of leaving the red deserts in which she was raised, there’s nothing she wants more than to nurture her skills at the prestigious planet-sized Oomza university. But when her classmates are massacred by an alien species aboard the ship ferrying Binti to her new home, it will take every ounce of courage she has to survive.

This book drew me in right from the start and held my attention the entire time. The space travel elements felt fresh and organic, and the novel by and large avoided the old-school sci-fi tropes that give books that sterile, metallic tang. I’m not sure what else science fiction is better for than exploring what it means to be human in a galactic context, and Binti lovingly leans into themes of adolescent anticipation, cultural alienation, and trans-cultural identity.

I really liked Binti as a protagonist; she’s brave, willing to fight tooth and nail for what she loves, but ultimately, her strength is her compassion and level head for diplomacy. Her Himba heritage plays a huge role in both the plot and her character development. I love a book that teaches me something new about another culture, and one of the most touching moments in the book was Binti wondering if she was going to be able to find the right ingredients on her new planet to make the paste of oil and clay the Himba cover their skin and hair with.

At only 90 pages, Binti clips along at a short-story pace that kept me from ever feeling bored. However, because of novella length, I felt like I was robbed of the sort of worldbuilding and setting details that would have really made me feel enveloped in the narrative. The descriptions I was given were sufficient, but sparse, and character development jerked along at times, prey to the pace. However, Binti is the first in a well-received trilogy that’s setting the standard for the new wave of afro-futurism, and I’m excited to pick up books two and three.

The Death of the Book Tour…Or Is It?

Today while sipping on an eggnog latte at Starbucks and putting off writing my finals, I came across this article in the Atlantic on the death of the modern book tour.

In it, the author details the cutbacks publishing houses had to push through after the 2008 recession, including shortening book tours, replacing touring publicists with local “escorts” who show authors around, and nixing the book tour entirely for most first-time authors.  It appears the days of running down Harper Collin’s company credit cards while traveling all over the world, if they ever existed, are coming to an end. While its true that lengthy book tours don’t always translate into booming sales, the author is quick to point out that the sort of intimacy and loyalty fostered between writers and their fans on tour is something that can’t be duplicated anywhere else.

I’m a big fan of the book tour. I’ve fumbled over my words while the amused and handsome Reza Aslan autographed my book, driven myself two hours across Jersey to talk spirituality and The Raven Cycle with Maggie Stiefvater, and have been comforted by Catherynne M. Valente on Twitter when I had to bail last-minute on a signing. I’ve also been introduced to the wonderful writing of Joseph Bathanti and Lauren Winner because someone took me with them to a reading.

Tours may be expensive, and they might not translate well to the number-crunching bottom line, but I’m not ready to give up on them yet. Yes, book tours aren’t always sexy, and every author has read aloud to a conference room with four people in it. But for authors who know how to create hype on social media, events can be much more well-attended and, in turn, well documented on Twitter, Tumblr, and all the other places readers go to find the Next Big Thing.

And on the note of the internet, one critical issue the author didn’t cover is virtual tours, a publicity move that I think is quickly gaining traction and credibility.  In this model, publicists assemble a squad of book bloggers and booktubers who release promo material, reviews, and maybe even author interviews over a series of days or week. It’s an amazing way for bloggers to connect with new authors and boost their own visibility, and for authors to promotw their book on grassroots level to a diverse audience. Still, that’s not quite the same experience as shaking an author’s hand or passing them a letter about how much their work has meant to you.

What are your thoughts on book tours? I’m wild about them, but maybe they are falling out of favor after all. But, as the chyerti of Valente’s Deathless would say, life is like that.

Indie Book Radar: Hemlock

hemlock

I don’t usually have the patience for all the page-views and mouse-clicking that goes into reading webcomics, but I devoured Josceline Fenton’s Hemlock.

The series follows Lumi, a witch who spends her days hawking spells to townspeople, travelling through the land in the shell of a giant snail, and brewing up poisons to keep her monstrous husband in a soporific stupor. Lumi is a dry and plucky protagonist, and I so enjoyed learning about her entanglements with blood magic, Baba Yaga’s dynasty of witch-prince sons, and the ne’er do wells of the witching world. Every new character introduced into the story is beautifully dressed, morally ambiguous, and full of secrets, which is just how I like them, and the 19th century setting in the forests and icy wastes of Scandinavia is absolutely enchanting.

I read all four volumes of Hemlock in two days, and now I’m addicted. The bad news is that the comic remains unfinished, since Fenton is holding down a day job as a cartoonist and animator, but she does update regularly.

The great news is that if you hate squinting at your computer screen during the nail-biting bits of your favorite comics, you can purchase bound copies of all four existing volumes of Hemlock. This is a must-read for fairy tale enthusiasts and fans of Catherynne Valente’s Deathless.

Got any favorite fairy tale inspired books? Tell me about them so I can add them to my TBR!

Spirituality Review: Still Evangelical?

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Title: Still Evangelical? Ten Insiders Reconsider Political, Social, and Theological Meaning. Edited by Mark Labberton
Genre: Essay Anthology/Christian Nonfiction
Rating: ★★★★ (4/5)

The evangelical movement is in crisis. After the missions boom of the seventies, rise of the right-wing Moral Majority in the eighties, decline in cultural influence in the nineties, and the fracturing of the movement after the 2016 presidential election in which 81% of white evangelicals voted for a man widely considered to not demonstrate Christian virtues, journalists are sounding evangelicalism’s death knell. In light of this crises, ten influential voices in evangelism have come together to unpack the election, talk social justice and spiritual renewal, and debate whether or not the label “evangelical” can truly be redeemed.

Full disclosure: I came of age in churches shaped by the evangelical movement, and remained evangelical for much of my life before being received into the Episcopal church in my first year of seminary. My feelings towards the evangelical movement are complex, and obviously, I had reasons for leaving. Despite this, I have close personal and professional ties with many in the evangelical church, and I’m interested in keeping my finger on the pulse of evangelicalism, especially in light of the huge sway it has held in the American church in the last fifty years.

I was worried this book might devolve into defensive protection of evangelicalism’s interests. But after reading the prologue, which incisively recounted the movement’s rise to power and subsequent decline after disastrous political collusion and the twilight of many of its central personalities, I was put more at ease. This is a book that intimately understands not only what is at stake for the evangelical movement, but the diversity of values within the movement and the innumerable wrongs the movement has been tied to theologically, politically, and socially.

There are traditional and progressive evangelicals here, and plenty of authors much harder to categorize. Jim Daly, president of the highly conservative Focus on the Family, is present, but so is Shawn Claiborne, a neo-monastic inspired by Christ to speak against war and the death penalty, and Lisa Sharon Harper, a black woman theologian with a passion for racial reconciliation. Together, the ten authors featured put forward a program that renounces political partisanship while upping political engagement, elevates the voices of minority and Majority World evangelicals, and sets aside church models predicated on stadium worship and cults of personalities. I didn’t agree with every opinion within the book, but I think that’s what made it for me: voices were held in tension without sacrificing their varying convictions or allowing ideological extremism to flourish. The presence of more women would have been welcome, but perhaps the lack of female writers represents the general trend evangelicalism has towards being a “boys’ club”.

Ultimately, the book urges readers to stick with the evangelical mission despite the loss of evangelical credibility in the eyes of most Americans. I can’t advocate for this choice either way, but I recommend this book to anyone interested in what went so wrong in evangelism and what evangelicals are doing to try and become better. It didn’t send me running home to the movement that raised me, but it did give me hope.

I received an advance review copy of Still Evangelical? from Intervarsity Press in exchange for an honest review. Still Evangelical? is set to drop in January 2018 and can be pre-ordered directly from Intervarsity Press or purchased on Amazon.