Author Interview with Nosetouch Press

I had a blast talking church grims, Southern Gothic, religious cultural memory, and pumpkin spice with the editorial team at Nosetouch Press. Full interview below!

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What is your favorite season and why?
Autumn, no contest. The spicy scent of decaying leaves, the spooky stories over spiced cider, the cold-fingered winds, the paper-thin veil between this world and the next…What’s not to love? Then again, my birthday falls on All Saints Day, so I’m partial.

What drew you to Folk Horror?
Historically folk horror has been very concerned with the muddied lines between older religions and newer ones, and the ways cultural memory gets buried only to resurge up in new, unexpected, even horrifying ways later. I love exploring the tangled emotions religious sentiment dregs up in people, and the way our distinctions between “magic” and “faith”, and “paganism” and “civilized religion” are largely matters of perspective. Folk horror has done a great job of teasing out these themes in the context of Western European rural life, and I wanted to bring those questions to the American South, where I was raised.

What does Folk Horror mean to you? How would you describe it to someone?
Folk horror is one of those wonderful genres that situates itself squarely in the natural landscape of its setting, whether that’s an English moor or a Puritan settlement in the New World. Besides this fixation on the (usually cursed and hungry) land, folk horror brings to mind stories about the ways sins of the past haunt communities in the present, the resilience of folk belief against modernism, the power religion has to corrupt, liberate, or annihilate, creeping mass hysteria, and inglorious characters with filthy secrets.

What is the most Folk Horror thing you’ve seen/encountered in your community?
I was once napping on a stone monument in a little graveyard behind a church that had been burned to the ground thrice, and I’m pretty sure a church grim padded up to snuffle at my hand. When I opened my eyes it was gone, but I know I heard it trotting across the dry leaves moments before.

What writing projects do you have next?
I just published a paranormal novella about a marriage between magicians, and now I’m back at work on a fantasy adventure novel about a gang of con goblins, arms dealers, diplomats, and pirates out to bring down the criminal queenpin who screwed them all over. However, I’m also hoping to find time to work on some short queered folklore stories, and the collection of Biblical poetry I’ve been chipping away at for years.

If you haven’t already grabbed your copy of THE FIENDS AND THE FURROWS FOLK HORROR ANTHOLOGY, you can still get your six stories full of malevolent forests, snake handling, and devilish harvests by Halloween! Look for my Southern Gothic story “Revival” at the book’s finale.

ODD SPIRITS is on 99¢ sale through the month of October!

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This novella will be on sale for the ghoulishly low price of $5.99 for paperbacks and 99¢ for e-copies until All Hallows Eve. You’ll never see it at a lower price, so grab your ticket to flirty tarot readings, folk religion, and mysterious hauntings today! 

It takes a lot of commitment to make a marriage between a modern ceremonial magician and a chaos witch work, but when a malevolent entity takes up residence in Rhys and Moira’s home, their love will be pushed to the limits. Brewing up a solution is easier said than done when your magical styles are polar opposites; throw a psychic ex and a secret society in the mix, and things are bound to get messy.

This diverse paranormal romance novella is perfect for fans of The Raven Cycle and The Haunting of Hill House!

“Like a lovingly-prepared home-cooked meal, Odd Spirits compels its reader to both devour and savor…Gibson’s background as a poet allows her to deftly create richly-drawn little moments.” –Rouges Portal

See what people are saying about the novella on Goodreads!

FIENDS has arrived!

THE FIENDS IN THE FURROWS anthology, featuring my Southern Gothic story “Revival”, is available now in ebook and paperback!

Growing up as a girl in a conservative religious community is challenging, especially when you’re the bastard child of a snake-handling Pentecostal preacher and a Catholic waitress. Considered unclean by the congregation and her grandfather, the fearsome Reverend, because of her affinity for the church’s’ venomous snakes, eight-year-old Callie Ann spends most of her time feeding crickets and mice to her only friends.

 But as the Reverend’s sinister hold on his rapt flock grows, so does Callie’s connection to her dead mother, and a dark prophecy begins to take shape. 

What People Are Saying

“Revival finds that old time religion venomously snaking its way back, to the peril of those who would dare to dance with vipers and tempt Fate itself.”

“Gibson’s Revival was like THE BAD SEED set to a religious hymn (that’s a good thing)”

If you’re craving some grimy gothic goodness with your brave little girls toppling abusive religious hierarchies, add FIENDS to your Goodreads TBR! Also be sure to subscribe to my intermittent author newsletter to stay in the loop about new publications, giveaways, and flash sales!  🕸🐍🌾💀

Odd Spirits is Available for Purchase

Welcome to publication day! Odd Spirits is now available for digital purchase in the Amazon kindle store and (if you don’t feel like giving Jeff Bezos 30% of your purchase) on Smashwords for only $2.99! That’s less than your morning latte!

It takes a lot of commitment to make a marriage between a modern ceremonial magician and a chaos witch work, but when a malevolent entity takes up residence in Rhys and Moira’s home, their love will be pushed to the limits. Brewing up a solution is easier said than done when your magical styles are polar opposites; throw a psychic ex and a secret society in the mix, and things are bound to get messy.

This diverse paranormal romance novella is perfect for fans of The Raven Cycle and The Haunting of Hill House.odd spirits

Can I read the digital copy without an e-reader? Absolutely! You can read it on your phone, laptop, or tablet for free without any special software

I only read print books. Will there be a paperback edition? Yes! As soon as Amazon approves my submission we will be in the paperback business. I will also be selling print copies direct from me if you prefer to bypass Amazon and get a free autograph out of the deal.

I pre-ordered a book and my order was cancelled? Sorry to hear that! Due to technichal difficulties, Amazon cancelled and refunded many pre-orders. DM and I’ll get you hooked up with your copy!

I’m strapped for cash right now; is there any other way I can support you? Reblogging this post is a great help to me! Also, if you’ve received a copy of the book, reviews on Amazon and Goodreads are a blessing to me.

I’d like to donate some spare change to your writing so you can turn out more books. Do you have a Patreon? Yes! Every donation helps, even one dollar, and I’ve got cute bat-themed prizes for my Patrons.

Thanks for your support, and happy reading!

Top 5 Spooky Books for Halloween

Even though Spooktober is well upon us, I wanted to share my favorite scary books for anyone looking to squeeze in a few more frights before Halloween. They run the gamut from pleasantly autumnal to deeply unsettling; so the Halloween homebody and horror aficionado alike should be able to find something suited to their tastes.

The Monstrumologist by Rick Yancey

This historical horror follows the gory adventures of Pellinore Warthrop, esteemed professor of “monstrumology”, and his eleven year old apprentice, Will Henry. The pair travel through the graveyards and basements of nineteenth-century New England in search of a brutal night beast. The book is presented as a series of diary entries discovered long after Will Henry’s death, and ruminations on Will Henry’s relationship with his demanding mentor accompany the accounts of autopsies and gunfights.

Although The Monstrumologist received the 2010 Michael L. Printz Honor Award for excellence in young adult literature, it remains fairly unknown in YA circles. This might be due to the book’s overall darkness, or it’s proclivity to wax nihilistic on the culpability of God in the face of evil. These factors, of course, only contributed to my love of the novel, and I’m pleased to say the entire four book series seriously delivers on scares, character development, and heart wrenching revelations.

House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski

This postmodern magnum opus layers the narratives of a photographer who documents the rooms which appear in his home without reason, the recently deceased man who left behind hundreds of pages of academic analysis on this event ten years later, and the troubled tattoo artist who slowly loses touch with reality while trying to piece together his disordered essay pages. The book is rife with footnotes, photographs, and appendixes, and as the story progresses, squares of text go missing, shocks of black assault the eyes, and words run backwards.

To make things even weirder, the various texts within don’t just cross reference each other, but real celebrities, poems, and events. You’re sent rushing to the internet to confirm that something you’ve always thought was real is indeed so, or to become very, very unsettled when you realize it actually isn’t. While an undertaking, the book draws in even the most impatient reader and refuses to let go until you’re tangled up in the unpleasant landscapes inside of your own head.

The Halloween Tree by Ray Bradbury

This charming adventure for “ages 11 and up” takes place on Halloween night in the American heartland. The costumed carousing of eight young boys leads them to the eccentric and ancient Mr. Moundshroud and an enormous “Halloween tree” bedecked with jack-o-lanterns. When something rises out of the shadows to snag the most beloved of the gang, Pipkin, Moundshroud leads the boys on a journey through Halloweens past in the hopes of rescuing him.

The Halloween Tree offers up the best of Bradbury, from his gleeful menage of metaphors and onamonapia to his strong thematic sense. Though the story is simple and the page-count a modest 145, the book explores the history of Halloween, the indissoluble bonds of childhood friendship, and the way humans have always dealt with the passing of  life into death. You’ve heard of the true meaning of Christmas; The Halloween Tree serves up the true meaning of Halloween with glee.

 The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein by Peter Ackroyd

This adult novel is my favorite re-telling of the Frankenstein story, one that imagines Victor Frankenstein as the troubled college friend of Percy Bysshe Shelly. Revolutionary, atheistic Percy goads the obsessively religious Victor into pushing deep into his creative potential, with disastrous results. The book features pitch-perfect guest appearances from the graverobbing Doomsday Men, hedonistic celebrity poet Lord Byron, and Mary Shelly herself. As Victor’s faith and sanity begin to unravel, the narrative hurdles towards tragedy with a sharp eloquence and gothic sensibilities that would make the staunchest Shellyphile proud.

Best read in one feverish sitting if possible, the novel eschews the supernatural for a more psychological approach to its scares, and has an absolutely wild twist ending that still satisfies.

The Haunting of Alaizabel Cray by Chris Wooding

This steampunky YA fantasy takes place in an alternative Victorian England split in halves by the Prussian war and ravaged by awful beasts referred to as wych-kin. Teenage wych-hunter Thaniel Fox uses a potent blend of magic and technology to keep the city safe. He teams up with Alaizabel Cray, a half-crazed girl who has been turned into a magnet for wych-kin by a high society cult. Together, the two must unravel esoteric conspiracies and evade the grisly serial killer whose story runs parallel to theirs.

There’s a lot going on in this book, but it’s all served up with substance and style in a slick, fast-paced package that really works for me. Wooding brings his eye for memorable, mature characters and immersive sensory detail to the novel, putting it a cut above many other YA offerings.