Genre Spotlight: ElfPunk

BookRiot recently put out an article that had my little faery-loving loving heart all a-flutter, an introductory reading list in the fantasy subgenre elfpunk. Hallmarks of elfpunk include a modern urban setting, new spins on old folk beliefs about the fae, fast cars, a dollop of teen angst, and lots and lots of rock and roll. Elfpunk tends to skew towards Western European folklore, and never seems to get tried of staging ballads of lost love in hazy nightclubs or pitting roving gangs of sidhe punks against each other in back alleys. I would call it my guilty pleasure but there’s nothing guilty about it; elfpunk shaped me into the writer I am today, and it’s still my favorite genre to read, full stop.

Emma Bull is among the authors on this list, and should be as one of the originators of the genre, and so is Holly Black, an author who remains almost unflaggingly loyal to stories of fae and humans in the modern day. But one huge piece was missing, the sprawling, enchanting originator of the entire genre: The Borderland Series.

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The Borderland series is a collection of short story anthologies and spin-off novels set in the shared universe of Bordertown, a city on the border of Faery and a large American metropolis. Bordertown is a shifting, dangerous place full of buskers and runaway teens and rock bands looking to strike it big in clubs crawling with feuding species. The original anthologies captured the wild dirty color of youth culture in the eighties, and were so successful that a follow-up anthology was published in 2011 featuring writers who had cut their teeth reading  Borderlands books as kids, heavy hitters like Catherynne Valente, Holly Black, Neil Gaiman, Cassandra Clare, and Charles DeLint.

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I checked the 2011 reboot out from my library three times in high school. Three.

It’s impossible to overemphasize the ripples Bordertown has made in the fantasy world; some people say it kicked off the urban fantasy genre wholesale. It’s inspired in part by Terri Winding’s experience of being a young artist in the mean streets of New York, which is an excited/terrified/starry eyed bouquet of emotion that so many of us can relate to. Everything Windling touches turns to gold, especially her anthologies, but the Bordertown Series is by far the most iconic.

So if you’re looking to get into some anachronistic, enchanted reads, don’t pass up this series. It’s really true what they say: even after all these years, Bordertown is always there waiting for you.

Top 5 Spooky Books for Halloween

Even though Spooktober is well upon us, I wanted to share my favorite scary books for anyone looking to squeeze in a few more frights before Halloween. They run the gamut from pleasantly autumnal to deeply unsettling; so the Halloween homebody and horror aficionado alike should be able to find something suited to their tastes.

The Monstrumologist by Rick Yancey

This historical horror follows the gory adventures of Pellinore Warthrop, esteemed professor of “monstrumology”, and his eleven year old apprentice, Will Henry. The pair travel through the graveyards and basements of nineteenth-century New England in search of a brutal night beast. The book is presented as a series of diary entries discovered long after Will Henry’s death, and ruminations on Will Henry’s relationship with his demanding mentor accompany the accounts of autopsies and gunfights.

Although The Monstrumologist received the 2010 Michael L. Printz Honor Award for excellence in young adult literature, it remains fairly unknown in YA circles. This might be due to the book’s overall darkness, or it’s proclivity to wax nihilistic on the culpability of God in the face of evil. These factors, of course, only contributed to my love of the novel, and I’m pleased to say the entire four book series seriously delivers on scares, character development, and heart wrenching revelations.

House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski

This postmodern magnum opus layers the narratives of a photographer who documents the rooms which appear in his home without reason, the recently deceased man who left behind hundreds of pages of academic analysis on this event ten years later, and the troubled tattoo artist who slowly loses touch with reality while trying to piece together his disordered essay pages. The book is rife with footnotes, photographs, and appendixes, and as the story progresses, squares of text go missing, shocks of black assault the eyes, and words run backwards.

To make things even weirder, the various texts within don’t just cross reference each other, but real celebrities, poems, and events. You’re sent rushing to the internet to confirm that something you’ve always thought was real is indeed so, or to become very, very unsettled when you realize it actually isn’t. While an undertaking, the book draws in even the most impatient reader and refuses to let go until you’re tangled up in the unpleasant landscapes inside of your own head.

The Halloween Tree by Ray Bradbury

This charming adventure for “ages 11 and up” takes place on Halloween night in the American heartland. The costumed carousing of eight young boys leads them to the eccentric and ancient Mr. Moundshroud and an enormous “Halloween tree” bedecked with jack-o-lanterns. When something rises out of the shadows to snag the most beloved of the gang, Pipkin, Moundshroud leads the boys on a journey through Halloweens past in the hopes of rescuing him.

The Halloween Tree offers up the best of Bradbury, from his gleeful menage of metaphors and onamonapia to his strong thematic sense. Though the story is simple and the page-count a modest 145, the book explores the history of Halloween, the indissoluble bonds of childhood friendship, and the way humans have always dealt with the passing of  life into death. You’ve heard of the true meaning of Christmas; The Halloween Tree serves up the true meaning of Halloween with glee.

 The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein by Peter Ackroyd

This adult novel is my favorite re-telling of the Frankenstein story, one that imagines Victor Frankenstein as the troubled college friend of Percy Bysshe Shelly. Revolutionary, atheistic Percy goads the obsessively religious Victor into pushing deep into his creative potential, with disastrous results. The book features pitch-perfect guest appearances from the graverobbing Doomsday Men, hedonistic celebrity poet Lord Byron, and Mary Shelly herself. As Victor’s faith and sanity begin to unravel, the narrative hurdles towards tragedy with a sharp eloquence and gothic sensibilities that would make the staunchest Shellyphile proud.

Best read in one feverish sitting if possible, the novel eschews the supernatural for a more psychological approach to its scares, and has an absolutely wild twist ending that still satisfies.

The Haunting of Alaizabel Cray by Chris Wooding

This steampunky YA fantasy takes place in an alternative Victorian England split in halves by the Prussian war and ravaged by awful beasts referred to as wych-kin. Teenage wych-hunter Thaniel Fox uses a potent blend of magic and technology to keep the city safe. He teams up with Alaizabel Cray, a half-crazed girl who has been turned into a magnet for wych-kin by a high society cult. Together, the two must unravel esoteric conspiracies and evade the grisly serial killer whose story runs parallel to theirs.

There’s a lot going on in this book, but it’s all served up with substance and style in a slick, fast-paced package that really works for me. Wooding brings his eye for memorable, mature characters and immersive sensory detail to the novel, putting it a cut above many other YA offerings.